Tag Archives: veterinary medicine

An Insider’s Guide to RX One Health Course in Tanzania (Part III): Life Lessons

Taylor Calloway (Class of 2018) was one of twenty-one students who participated in the new Rx One Health Course based in Tanzania and Rwanda during June 2017. This is Taylor’s personal narrative aiming to illustrate her daily experiences, a deeper understanding of the One Health approach in a real-world setting, and the big question of “why is this course important.”

Taylor’s journey Part III

(Read Part I and Part II)

06/13/2017

Needing a closer look, we were all working together to identify Giraffe Skin disease.

After a discussion about the ecology of the environment possibly effecting the Cape Buffalo populations and disease ecology of the giraffe skin disease, we ate breakfast and headed out of Ruaha National Park. We ventured to Idodi Health Clinic that works on a project with Rift Valley Fever and Brucellosis surveillance in the area. It was considered the nicest health clinics in Iringa. The clinic creates a large impact on community health by maintaining supplies, having organized areas of disease screening, and pregnancy/labor assistance specific areas.

Our driver told us a story about a mountain range outside of Ruaha. He explained that the Hehe would journey over the top to be blessed with pregnancy. This is because it looks like a woman lying down on her back with a pregnant belly. I proceeded to tell him that we are not allowed to cross over the mountain range for a long time.

Once back in Iringa we went shopping. I bought many gifts … ones that might end up being just for me. I grew closer to a couple people on the trip, exchanging stories and laughing for hours. I hope that we all stay in contact long after the course ends.

Kalenga kelu (Whehe word) mountain for the gift of pregnancy (meaning clear water).

06/14/2017

Our day started with us running late. About two hours late. Which meant our eight-hour ride to Bagamoyo, a coastal town by Zanzabar, ended at 9:30 pm. So it was a long car day to say the least.

Sokoine University of Agriculture, cattle facility.

We were able to stop briefly in Morogoro to tour Sokoine University of Agriculture. We spoke with apopo, rat, tuberculosis laboratory about their African burrowing rat training program to identify TB from human sputum. All of the veterinary students almost stole the rats, they were adorable and showed off their intelligence when we saw training demonstrations. (Side note: you can support one of these rats and the program will send you notices on how they are doing. Great present idea for the activists and animal lovers in your life. No they did not pay me to tell you this. I just really loved the rats!) Then we spoke with Dr. Abel Ekiri about the HALI project’s virology lab, which was recently made out of two shipping containers. It was housed with technology we use at UC Davis and flowed in a way that was organized and really made sense.

Maria Ertner and Nathan Brown getting their animal time in before the African burrowing rat demonstrates the TB detection process.

It was a good day of getting to know the people in our cars, and learning how long we can hold it before short calls need to be made! Maria and I exchanged music so I will go home with a list of new songs to buy. We just arrived in Bagomoyo. I have eaten and now I am exhausted. Lala salama!

Tanzanian Gold is the phrase used when the locals refer to their country’s wildlife. That alone speaks volumes to the pride shown by the citizens of Tanzania. My dream is to see that type of feeling fill the minds of more people in the United States. Life would be much more beautiful. Continue reading

An Insider’s Guide to RX One Health Course in Tanzania (Part II): Learning How Much I Don’t Know!

Taylor Calloway (Class of 2018) was one of twenty-one students who participated in the new Rx One Health Course based in Tanzania and Rwanda during June 2017. This is Taylor’s personal narrative aiming to illustrate her daily experiences, a deeper understanding of the One Health approach in a real-world setting, and the big question of “why is this course important.”

Taylor’s journey Part II

06/6/2017

Our group learing about Neema Crafts and how they create prints for their nonprofit organization.

Habari azobuhi (Good morning)!! Starting at seven am with the understanding that three lectures were to come after was not something everyone looks forward to and I certainly did not. Yet, the lectures morphed into deep discussions. There were “big picture” talks on the One Health approach used in Tanzania including the country’s infectious diseases and human-animal conflicts. This made my mind race with ideas on projects yet to begin. I am definitely where I should be to find my niche in veterinary medicine so I can include the One Health approach in life.

We had lunch after touring the place we were gathering for lectures called Neema Crafts. Neema= Grace in Swahili. They are a non-profit organization that employs the local disabled people of Iranga and teaches them trades like weaving, ceramics, metalworking, screen-printing, glass bead making and woodcarving. These are then sold to tourists and some locals for the continuation of the organization.

Our group learning about Neema Crafts and how they create prints for their nonprofit organization.

There was a story that stood out to me. One of the first deaf men employed was found under a basket, hidden away from the world by a family that believed they were cursed. He was given a sign name of hunchback (this is pointing to your back). He worked extremely hard and was promoted to teaching new members the different crafts. After some time, his colleagues did change his name. Now when people ask about him, his sign is two fists pounding downwards. This means I am capable.

Friends already. Mwokozi Mwanzalila and June Barrera are already getting along.

In the afternoon we toured the local markets. People were able to practice their Swahili, bargain for gifts and learn more about the Tanzanian culture. There was a little girl who ran up to me and smiled. I smiled back and said, “mambo” (hello to a friend). “Shikamoo” her little voice responding to me (a respectful hello). The clothes and personalities of everyone we saw and talked with were very unique. There was one man in a bright orange suit, a woman covered from head to toe in a brown cape and another woman with a fur sweatshirt. I am learning that the more I see, the less I know.

My young friend who welcomed me to Tanzania.

Fish at the downtown market place.

Downtown Iringa

First sighting of a veterinary clinic in Iringa .

The evening became a lesson in communication and leadership skills. The whole group discovered our unique styles from a communication and leadership exercise. Without giving too much away, we had to be able to work together to “zoom” in and out of a story. Confusing right? Well we thought so, but in the end we did pull through and find a solution. The exercise reminded us that we all have our own set of skills to bring to the table and by communicating properly, we can help each other figure out a finished product. By the end of it, we were all very proud and tired. Dinner was served and a lecture, led by Dr. Mazet, on soft leadership skills (communication) finished our day around 8:30 pm.

Swahili Words of the Day: Bafum, Shower; Choo, toilet Continue reading

An Insider’s Guide to RX One Health Course in Tanzania (Part I)

Rx One Health Course Travel Blog: The Insiders Guide

Maasi artist

Maasi Mama Rosie Mgemaa made the arm bracelet held by Taylor Calloway (Class of 2018).

Taylor Calloway (Class of 2018) was one of twenty-one students who participated in the new Rx One Health Course based in Tanzania and Rwanda during June 2017. This is Taylor’s personal narrative aiming to illustrate her daily experiences, a deeper understanding of the One Health approach in a real-world setting, and the big question of “why is this course important.”

Follow Taylor’s journey through pictures, videos and tales as she attempts to understand the foundations of One Health while learning new veterinary skills, developing her place in a cooperative and immersive professional team, making life-long memories and friends, and embracing an inimitable, but personally foreign culture.

PART I

06/4/2017

Having never traveled to any African countries before, and this journey being a dream of mine since the age of seven, I was extremely anxious arriving at the San Francisco International Airport. All I could think was “Dang you, Animal Planet, for giving me dreams!”

Once I arrived in D.C. for a connecting flight, two fellow Rx One Health participants found me before our next flights—a classmate, June, and a new friend from Georgia, Marie. Thirteen hours to Addis Ababa, Ethiopia proved to be uneventful, and the next three hours to Dar es Salaam, Tanzania followed suit.

We were luckier than others. Once we arrived, the discovery of lost luggage by a participant and course leader left the three of us empathetic as we all understand that fear. This is especially worrisome as we leave on another plane for Iringa, Tanzania tomorrow morning. Unpredictability is scary and unfortunately a very real issue with international travel in general. Yet, as unsettled as both these individuals were, they also decided to figure out a plausible solution together, which I felt helped ease the unnerving feeling.

Southern Sun Hotel in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

I was happy to discover that we all had our own rooms for the first night to settle in and readjust ourselves for what is to come the next month. We were able to eat dinner at the Southern Sun Hotel (which is a beautiful hotel with great food), sing Happy Birthday to Eric, a public health veterinary student, and get to know each other a little before heading to bed early.

First four to meet at the Southern Sun Hotel. Left to right: Maria Ertner (Demark), Alessandra Amadeo (California), June Barrera (California), and Marie Bosch (Georgia).

Continue reading

Leadership Critical to Future of Veterinary Medicine

Delegates to the SAVMA Symposium included from left: Navneet Saini (Class of 2019), Elizabeth Malcolm (Class of 2018), and Jamie Lemus (Class of 2020)

Contributed by Elizabeth Malcolm, Class of 2018 

A few weeks ago, I had the privilege of attending the SAVMA Symposium at Texas A&M along with seven other veterinary students from UC Davis. I attended on behalf of the SAVMA Executive Board, while other students attended to represent our local chapter.

During the House of Delegates (HOD) meetings, Navneet Saini (SAVMA Delegate and Class of 2019) accepted the Teaching Excellence award on behalf of Dr. Jim Clark, which was a huge honor as this was the second year in a row UC Davis has received this award. In addition, the HOD recognized Tereza Chylkova (Class of 2017) as the recipient of the Jon Pitts award. This award recognizes one veterinary student that has gone above and beyond in service and dedication to the veterinary profession. The awards received during Symposium are of high honor, and represent the incredible students and faculty we are blessed to have here at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine.

My involvement in organized medicine has been incredibly rewarding, as it has allowed me to experience first-hand the impact that one person, be that a student or veterinarian, can have on our profession. After I return from each of these symposiums, I always feel inspired and motivated to advocate further for issues that affect our profession. Whether the topic relates to challenges we face such as student debt, or mental health and wellness, or conversely celebrating scientific advances we have made, everything discussed on a national level has direct impacts on our experiences as veterinarians.

If there is one thing I could pass on to students of this profession, I would encourage them to become as involved in leadership roles and organized medicine as possible. Our profession is incredibly small and interconnected, and it is magnificent to feel like we can all make a difference for ourselves and others. I have no double that is truly the best profession in the world.

 

Learning the Importance of Advocacy in Veterinary Medicine

Contributed by Roxana Bordbar, Class of 2018

In front of the CVMA headquarters in Sacramento, from left to right: Valerie Fenstermaker, Vicky Yang, Elizabeth Malcolm, Grant Miller, Roxana Bordbar, Julie Dobbs, Audrey Buatois, Elizabeth Tenborg, Christina Thompson, Jenny Tsai, Christina DiCaro, Della Yee.

In front of the CVMA headquarters in Sacramento, from left to right: Valerie Fenstermaker, Vicky Yang, Elizabeth Malcolm, Grant Miller, Roxana Bordbar, Julie Dobbs, Audrey Buatois, Elizabeth Tenborg, Christina Thompson, Jenny Tsai, Christina DiCaro, Della Yee.

For many veterinary students at UC Davis, the California Veterinary Medical Association (CVMA), may often seem like an enigmatic entity. Everyone knows what the CVMA is, but many are not quite sure what the CVMA actually does behind the scenes. Thus, it was the mission of Elizabeth Malcolm and I to change that, at least for a few students. We wanted to bring students up close and personal to the action—we wanted to show them what the CVMA and organized veterinary medicine really does for the veterinary profession.

It all started in February of 2016, when Elizabeth and I had the life-changing opportunity of attending the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) legislative fly-in as the SAVMA Delegate and CVMA Student Representative, respectively. To sum it up, we flew to Washington D.C. where we were briefed by the AVMA on current legislation important to veterinarians and veterinary students, and we subsequently went to Capitol Hill to advocate and lobby for these positions at the offices of Senators Diane Feinstein and Barbara Boxer, and Congressman John Garamendi. Let’s just say that it was an incredibly successful trip; we learned so much and we came back invigorated and full of passion for organized veterinary medicine and advocacy! Continue reading